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New Building Regulations

Code of PracticeCode of Practice1

Code of Practice
for
Inspecting and Certifying
Buildings and Works
Building Control
Regulations 2014
February, 2014

Table of Contents

1. Introduction 1
1.1 Status and Purpose of Code 1
1.2 Overview of Code 1
1.3 Application 2
1.4 Regulatory Design Principles 2
1.5 Regulatory Oversight 2

2. Definitions 3


3. Roles and Duties 6
3.1 Key Responsibility 6
3.2 Building Owner’s Role 6
3.3 Builder’s Role 7
3.4 Designer’s Role 8
3.5 Assigned Certifier’s Role 8
3.6 Role of Building Control Authority 9
3.6.1 Overall Role 9
3.6.2 Commencement Stage - Validation 10
3.6.3 Construction stage – assessment and inspection 11
3.6.4 Completion stage 11

4. Certification 12

4.1 Certificates Required 12
4.2 Signing as Design Certifier and/or as the Assigned Certifier 12
4.2.1 Assigned Certifier and Design Certifier 12
4.2.2 Ancillary Certifiers 12
4.3 Certificate of Compliance (Design) 13
4.4 Undertaking by Assigned Certifier 13
4.5 Undertaking by Builder 14
4.6 Certificate of Compliance on Completion 14
4.7 Change of Assigned Certifier and/or Builder 14

5. Lodgement of Plans and Documentation 15

5.1 Plans and specifications 15
5.2 Other Documentation 16
5.3 Lodgement of plans at later stage 16

6. Commencement Stage 17

6.1 Submission to Building Control Authority 17

7. Construction Stage Inspection – by Certifiers 17

7.1 Inspection Plan 17
7.1.1 Factors in Determining Inspection Plan 18
7.1.2 Inspection 18
7.2 Inspection frequency 19
7.3 Inspection Notification Framework (INF) 19
7.4 Follow up procedures 20
7.5 Tests 20
7.6 Records of inspection 20

8. Completion Stage 20

8.1 Submission at completion 20
8.2 Validation and Registration of Certificate 21
8.3 Nominated Date for Registration of Certificate 22
8.4 Phased Completion 23

9. Archiving of Records 23

10. E-lodgements 23

11. Professional Ethics 23

12. Insurance 24

Appendix: List of Requirements under Building Regulations 25
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 1
1. Introduction

1.1 Status and Purpose of Code

(1) This Code of Practice is published by the Minister with reference to Article
20G of the Building Control Regulations. The purpose of the Code of
Practice is to provide guidance with respect to inspecting and certifying
works or a building for compliance with the requirements of the Second
Schedule to the Building Regulations.
(2) Where works or a building to which the Building Control Regulations apply
are inspected and certified in accordance with the guidance contained in
this Code of Practice, this shall, prima facie, indicate compliance with the
relevant requirements of the Building Control Regulations.
(3) The provisions of any guidance contained in this Code of Practice
concerning the use of a particular inspection framework or approach will not
be construed as prohibiting the use of other suitable frameworks or
approaches.

1.2 Overview of Code

Building Control Regulations provide for matters of procedure, administration and
control for the purposes of securing the implementation of the requirements of the
Building Regulations and of demonstrating how compliance with such requirements
has been achieved in relation to the building or works concerned.
This Code of Practice gives practical guidance on relevant statutory provisions for
persons who undertake the role of Assigned Certifier as provided for in the Building
Control Regulations and who are tasked with preparing an inspection plan to be
implemented by themselves and others during construction in order that they are in
a position to sign the Certificate of Compliance on Completion as Assigned Certifier.
The code sets out standards and procedures that should be adhered to by:
• Building owners
• Designers
• Builders
• Certifiers
• Building Control Authorities
• Building materials and component manufacturers.
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 2

1.3 Application

The Code of Practice covers the inspection and certification aspects of the Building
Control Regulations. The Code of Practice applies to buildings and works for which
Certificates of Compliance under the Building Control Regulations are required. The
areas covered include:
• Certification
• Lodgement of plans and documentation
• Inspections during construction
• Roles and duties.

1.4 Regulatory Design Principles

The overall objective of the revised building control system is to achieve better
building construction. The aim is to ensure that all involved in the construction
process and the regulatory system work effectively to achieve this. A set of design
principles has been used in developing the system of building control and in particular
this code. These principles are summarised as follows:
1) using a number of complementary measures and interventions to achieve
compliance;
2) putting in place reasonable and appropriate interventionist measures as
necessary to ensure quality outcomes are achieved;
3) providing early warning of non-compliance (for the benefit of private sector
and building control authorities) so as to build in regulatory responsiveness
and to increase the dependability of outcomes ;
4) empowering third parties (both commercial and non-commercial) to positively
influence compliance with regulatory requirements, thereby achieving better
outcomes at less cost and deploying available regulatory resources as
effectively as possible; and
5) encouraging all participants to achieve good outcomes and recognising that,
while the legal requirements set minimum standards which must be achieved,
there should be an ambition to exceed these.

1.5 Regulatory Oversight

Oversight is central to the revised arrangements for the control of building activity that
will operate from 1 March 2014. Building Control Regulations require the private
sector to play an active part in achieving compliance and providing better buildings. A
key aim of the Code is for regulatory oversight to ensure a culture of compliance with
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 3
Building Regulations using a risk based approach to target those who are noncompliant.
Building Owners, Designers and Builders are responsible for the notices, certificates,
plans and documentation that are to be lodged with building control authorities.
Regulatory oversight is necessary in order to ensure that any failure of regulation
among the agencies involved – be they Building Owners, Designers, Builders and/or
Building Control Authorities is detected and remedied in an effective and timely
manner.
A key element in detection is the system of risk analysis, whereby the online Building
Control Management, having regard to the notices and documents lodged at
commencement, will inform the Building Control Authority’s decisions to deploy
available resources towards the inspection and investigation of those construction
projects where the risk of failure is highest. This will help Building Control Authorities
to escalate findings of non-compliance and, where necessary, effectively use their
powers of inspection, enforcement and prosecution in the event of serious breaches
of Building Regulations. The aim is that the powers of enforcement and prosecution
will become a more credible threat to those who are non-compliant.

2. Definitions

The definitions set out below are for the purpose of explaining terms used in this
Code of Practice. They are not, and should not be construed as being, legal
definitions or interpretations of similar terms which may be used in the Act of 1990 or
any regulations made thereunder.
“Act of 1990” means the Building Control Act 1990 (No. 3 of 1990) as amended by
the Building Control Act 2007 (No. 21 of 2007);
“Ancillary Certificates” means a certificate other than a statutory certificate of
compliance as prescribed in the Building Control Regulations given by a
competent person to confirm compliance of elements of the building,
design or works with Building Regulations; and “Ancillary Certifier” means a
person proposed to issue such a statement. (Note: a “person” also includes
a company);
“Assigned Certifier” means the competent, registered professional person so
assigned, in accordance with the Building Control Regulations;
“Builder” means a competent builder appointed, for purposes of the Building Control
Regulations, by the building owner, to build and supervise the works;
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 4
"Building Control Authority" means a Local Authority to which section 2 of the
Building Control Act 1990 applies;
"Building Control Regulations" means the Building Control Regulations 1997 to
2014 and any amendments thereto;
“Building Owner” means the person who has commissioned or paid for the works
and who has legal entitlement to have such works carried out on their
behalf;
"Building Regulations" means the Building Regulations 1997 to 2013 and any
amendments thereto;
"Certificate of Compliance" means a certificate of compliance provided for under
section 6(2)(a)(i) of the Act of 1990;
‘‘Commencement Notice’’ means a notice referred to in section 6(2) (k) of the Act of
1990;
“Competent Person”: a person is deemed to be a competent person where, having
regard to the task he or she is required to perform and taking account of
the size and/or complexity of the building or works, the person possesses
sufficient training, experience and knowledge appropriate to the nature of
the work to be undertaken;
"Construction" includes the execution of works in connection with buildings and any
act or operation necessary for, or related to the construction, extension,
alteration, repair or renewal of a building; and "constructed" will be
construed accordingly;
"Design" includes the preparation of plans, particulars, drawings, specifications,
calculations and other expressions of purpose according to which the
Construction, extension, alteration, repair or renewal concerned is to be
executed and "designed" will be construed accordingly;
“Design Certifier” means the person who signs the Certificate of Compliance
(Design);
"Enforcement Notice" has the meaning assigned to it by section 8 of the Act of
1990;
“Inspection Notification Framework” or “INF” has the meaning set down in
section 7.3 of this Code of Practice;
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 5
“Inspection Plan” has the meaning set down in section 7.1 of this Code of Practice;
"the Minister" means the Minister for the Environment, Community and Local
Government;
"works" includes any act or operation in connection with the Construction, extension,
alteration, repair or renewal of a building;
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 6

3. Roles and Duties

3.1 Key Responsibility
There is an obligation under section 3(5) of the Building Control Act 1990 that
buildings be designed and constructed in accordance with the relevant requirements
of the Building Regulations. Building Owners, Designers and Builders are bound by
this legal requirement. In undertaking building works, appropriate measures should
be taken so that the work is in accordance with the Building Regulations. Designers,
Builders and certifiers should exercise reasonable skill, care and diligence in the
exercise of their duties. They and persons assigned by them should be competent for
the work they undertake.
3.2 Building Owner’s Role
The Building Owner is ultimately responsible for ensuring that buildings or works are
carried out in accordance with the requirements of the Building Regulations. In
relation to the Design and Construction of buildings, the Building Owner should
ensure that they appoint a competent Builder and competent registered professionals
to act as Designer and as Assigned Certifier.
Specifically, the Building Owner should:
(a) ensure that a Fire Safety Certificate and a Disability Access Certificate are
obtained where required;
(b) sign a Commencement Notice (or 7 day notice) that is lodged;
(c) sign the notice for the assignment of:
1) a competent, registered professional (the Assigned Certifier) who will
inspect the building works during Construction and provide a certificate
of compliance on completion, and
2) a competent Builder to construct in accordance with the plans,
specifications and Building Regulations and to sign the Certificate of
Compliance on completion; Builders included on the Construction
Industry Register Ireland or equivalent may be regarded as competent
for projects consistent with their registration profile.
(d) ensure that adequate resources and competent persons are made available
to design, construct, inspect and certify the building works;
(e) promptly appoint a replacement Assigned Certifier or Builder where the
Assigned Certifier or Builder withdraws from the project for whatever reason;
where this happens the Building Owner is required under the Building Control
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 7
Regulations to give notice to the Building Control Authority of the new
assignment; at all times the Building Owner should use reasonable
endeavours to ensure that an Assigned Certifier and Builder are in place;
(f) where there is a change of Building Owner, prior to the submission of the
completion certificate, the new Building Owner is required under the Building
Control Regulations to give notice of the change of Building Owner and, also,
to notify the Building Control Authority in writing of all appointments that are in
place; and
(g) maintain records.
3.3 Builder’s Role
The Builder should carry out the works in accordance with the plans and
specifications of the professional design team, their specialists and sub-consultants
as necessary and have regard to these in accordance with the requirements of the
Building Regulations.
The Builder (company or sole trader) should:
(a) accept from the Building Owner the assignment to build and supervise the
building or works outlined in the Commencement Notice;
(b) familiarise themselves with the drawings, specifications and documents
lodged with the Commencement Notice;
(c) ensure a competent person is assigned to oversee the Construction works;
(d) co-operate with the design team, the Assigned Certifier and other certifiers;
(e) ensure that the workmanship complies with the requirements of the Building
Regulations;
(f) ensure that materials which they select and for which they are responsible
comply with the requirements of the Building Regulations;
(g) sign the Certificate of Compliance (completion);
(h) provide to the Assigned Certifier, such documents for which they are
responsible, as may assist the Assigned Certifier to collate particulars for the
purposes of handover and certification, and/or for further submissions to the
Building Control Authority;
(i) ensure the coordination and provision of all test certificates and confirmations
to the satisfaction of the Assigned Certifier or other designated inspectors or
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 8
certifiers providing Ancillary Certificates; and
(j) maintain records.
3.4 Designer’s Role
Designers should: -
(a) design their respective elements of work in accordance with the applicable
requirements of the Second Schedule to the Building Regulations;
(b) provide the Design Certifier with the necessary plans, specifications and
documentation that is required for lodgement at commencement stage;
(c) arrange to provide sufficient information to the Assigned Certifier to enable
them to fulfil their role;
(d) as agreed with the Assigned Certifier, carry out work inspections which are
pertinent to their elements of the Design, and liaise with the Assigned Certifier
in terms of this and the required ancillary certification;
(e) notify the Assigned Certifier of their proposed inspection regime for inclusion
in the overall Inspection Plan;
(f) provide the Ancillary Certificates when required by the Assigned Certifier and
Design Certifier; and
(g) maintain records of inspection.
3.5 Assigned Certifier’s Role
The Assigned Certifier is assigned by the Building Owner as required under the
Building Control Regulations. They undertake to inspect, and to co-ordinate the
inspection activities of others during construction, and to certify the building or works
on completion. The role of Assigned Certifier does not include responsibility for the
supervision of any builder. They may or may not be a member of the design team.
The Assigned Certifier should: -
(a) provide and sign the relevant statutory certificates - the form of undertaking at
commencement and the Certificate of Compliance on Completion;
(b) co-ordinate the ancillary certification by members of the design team and
other relevant bodies for the Certificate of Compliance on Completion;
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 9
(c) identify all design professionals and specialists, in conjunction with the
Builder, from whom certificates are required;
(d) identify all certificates required and obtain them;
(e) co-ordinate and collate all certification of compliance for completion in
conjunction with the Builder;
(f) in consultation with the members of the design team, plan and oversee the
implementation of the Inspection Plan during Construction;
(g) prepare the Preliminary Inspection Plan and oversee adherence to this plan,
and on completion provide the Inspection Plan as implemented;
(h) on termination or relinquishment of their appointment make available to the
Building Owner all certification prepared and inspection reports carried out;
(i) act as the single point of contact with the Building Control Authority during
construction;
(j) seek advice from the Building Control Authority, in respect of compliance
matters relating to the building or works where disputes or differences of
opinion arise between the parties to the project; and
(k) maintain records of inspection.
3.6 Role of Building Control Authority
3.6.1 Overall Role
The Building Control Authority should:
(a) process applications for Fire Safety Certificates and Disability Access
Certificates and issue decisions on those applications;
(b) validate and register Commencement Notices / 7-day Notices and the
accompanying Certificates of Compliance (Design), notices of assignment by
Building Owner, and notices of undertakings by the Assigned Certifier and the
Builder;
(c) undertake a risk analysis of each commencement notice submitted in order to
inform its own inspection arrangements;
(d) advise the Assigned Certifier, in relation to issues of compliance relating to
the building or works that are disputed by parties to the construction project;
(e) validate and register the Certificate of Compliance on Completion and
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 10
accompanying documentation submitted in support of same;
(f) maintain a public register of Building Control decisions and activity; and
(g) maintain records, including records of inspection
Under the Act of 1990 Building Control Authorities have strong powers of inspection,
enforcement and prosecution. While Building Control Authorities use enforcement
and the courts to effect compliance where reasonable and appropriate to do so,
desired results can also be achieved, and often are, through discussion and
persuasion with the threat of legal action.
It is expected that Building Control Authorities will undertake an appropriate level of
assessment and inspection informed by the risk analysis of commencement notices
submitted via the Building Control Management System, thereby ensuring that
available inspection resources are targeted towards projects carrying the greatest
risks. Inspections by Building Control Authorities are undertaken in the interests of
public safety and law enforcement. This does not relieve building owners, builders,
designers or assigned certifiers of their statutory obligations to build and construct in
compliance with the requirements of the Building Regulations and to demonstrate
through inspection, certification and lodgement of documentation how compliance
has been achieved in practice.
Where inspections are carried out by Building Control Authorities they should make
their inspection reports available to Assigned Certifiers and the Builders on an ongoing
basis.
3.6.2 Commencement Stage - Validation
On receipt of the Commencement Notice, together with the notices of assignment of
Builder and Assigned Certifier and their respective undertakings and the Design
Certificate and accompanying plans and documentation the Building Control
Authority will undertake a validation process on the documentation submitted. There
is no requirement or obligation on the Building Control Authority to carry out a
technical assessment of the plans or other documents submitted, see section 6(4) of
the Building Control Act 1990. Separate to its administrative function of maintaining a
statutory register of building activity, Building Control Authorities have strong powers
of inspection and enforcement under the Building Control Acts. They should exercise
these powers based on the combination of risk-based assessment and random
selection.
The purpose of the lodgement of plans, mandatory inspection by registered
professionals, statutory certificates of compliance and registration of certificates and
accompanying documentation is to ensure a strong culture of compliance with the
Building Regulations, and greater accountability and transparency in the process.
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 11
From the Building Control Authority’s perspective, any plans and documentation
lodged will be readily available should the particular project be selected for a building
control inspection.
3.6.3 Construction stage – assessment and inspection
Building Control Authorities should adopt a formal policy for the assessment and
inspection of building work as notified on the Building Control Management System.
Authorities should adopt a risk management based approach in undertaking this
work. This will include consideration of matters such as: -
(a) the use of the building;
(b) the type of construction;
(c) the level of experience of the design team and the Builder; and
(d) past experience regarding compliance by the parties involved in the project.
In addition a level of random assessment and inspection should be carried out.
In line with the agreed Service Indicators for Local Government, Building Control
Authorities are required to carry out a level of inspection equivalent to 12% to 15% of
new buildings for which valid commencement notices have been received.
Building Control Authorities should keep full records of all assessments and
inspections carried out. Inspection reports should be made available to the Assigned
Certifier and the Builder.
3.6.4 Completion stage
The role of the Building Control Authority at completion stage is to validate the
submission of the Certificate of Compliance on Completion and, where appropriate to
include details of same in the statutory register of building control activity. The
validation process will include checking that the certificate was properly completed
and signed by the appropriate persons. The authority will check that there are no
unresolved matters in relation to requests under Section 11 of the Act or Enforcement
Notices or conditions attached to Fire Safety Certificates, Disability Access
Certificates, etc. It is not appropriate for the Building Control Authority to commence a
technical assessment at this stage.
Documents accompanying the certificate of compliance on completion should be
retained on the Building Control Management System by the Building Control
Authority.
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 12

4. Certification

4.1 Certificates Required
As set out in the Building Control Regulations, certificates are required for certain
buildings and works. The following four certificates are required to be submitted:
(a) the Design Certificate signed by the Design Certifier at the commencement
stage;
(b) the form of Undertaking signed by the Assigned Certifier at the commencement
stage;
(c) the form of Undertaking signed by the Builder at the commencement stage; and
(d) the Certificate of Compliance on Completion signed by the Builder and by the
Assigned Certifier at completion stage.
4.2 Who can sign as the Design Certifier and/or as the Assigned Certifier
4.2.1 Assigned Certifier and Design Certifier
The following may be appointed and sign as the Assigned Certifier, provided they are
competent in relation to the particular works involved:
(a) Architects that are on the register maintained by the RIAI under Part 3 of the
Building Control Act 2007; or
(b) Building Surveyors that are on the register maintained by the SCSI under
Part 5 of the Building Control Act 2007; or
(c) Chartered Engineers on the register maintained by Engineers Ireland under
section 7 of the Institution of Civil Engineers of Ireland (Charter Amendment)
Act 1969.
Similarly, the Design Certifier must be one of the above registered professionals and
must be competent to carry out their design and to co-ordinate the design activities of
others for the works concerned.
4.2.2 Ancillary Certifiers
Apart from the Assigned Certifier and Design Certifier there is likely to be a range of
certifiers on most projects, including certifiers appointed by the Building Owner, by his
design team and/or by the Builder. Ancillary certifiers may include:
· Architects and Architectural Technologists/Technicians;
· Consulting Engineers (especially structural/civil and mechanical/electrical)
appointed by the Building Owner to design, inspect and certify the relevant
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 13
elements of the works;
· Designers (e.g. for piling, for mechanical/electrical work, for soil and waste
pipework or for precast concrete elements) appointed by the Builder to design
and certify the relevant elements of the works;
· other competent technical and trade persons that install products and/or test
on completion; and/or
· the Builder, sub-contractors, suppliers and manufacturers, both in relation to
certifying Design and Construction, and also in relation to components or
assemblies supplied for the works, and/or in relation to tests.
Every certifier should exercise reasonable skill, care and diligence in the exercise of
their duties.

4.3 Certificate of Compliance (Design)
The Design Certifier signs the Design Certificate that is lodged with the
Commencement Notice and ensures that any necessary Ancillary Certificates from
members of the design team are scheduled and lodged as necessary and
appropriate. The Design Certifier is responsible for co-ordinating and compiling and
scheduling of the plans, calculations, specifications and particulars that are to be
included on the schedule to be lodged at commencement and to which the Design
Certificate relates. The lodgement of plans and documentation is dealt with below.
Where elements of the Design have not been completed, these should be clearly set
out with an undertaking that when complete, these too will be certified and submitted
to the Building Control Authority.
The Design Certifier, in compiling the plans and documentation and in preparing the
Design Certificate should review the scope of requirements of the Building
Regulations that apply to the building work concerned. A Summary List of the
requirements of the Building Regulations is provided in the Appendix.

4.4 Undertaking by Assigned Certifier
The Assigned Certifier, appointed by the Building Owner, gives an undertaking to
coordinate the inspection of the works by themselves and others and to certify the
works on completion.
The individual certifiers should undertake to inspect and to cooperate with the other
members of the Building Owner’s design team in accordance with the Inspection Plan
based on Section 7 below. They also provide the necessary Ancillary Certificates to
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 14
the Assigned Certifier.

4.5 Undertaking by Builder
The Builder, appointed by the Building Owner, gives an undertaking to construct, to
cooperate with the Assigned Certifier and to sign the Certificate of Compliance on
Completion as required under the Building Control Regulations.
As part of this undertaking, the Builder should co-ordinate the work of specialist subcontractors
and designers and should ensure that Ancillary Certificates of
Compliance are provided.

4.6 Certificate of Compliance on Completion
The Assigned Certifier and the Builder sign the Certificate of Compliance on
Completion, supported by Ancillary Certificates from other members of the design
team and by certificates from specialist sub-contractors.
The Assigned Certifier lodges the following on the Building Control Management
System with the Building Control Authority:
(a) the Certificate of Compliance on Completion, supported by a schedule of Ancillary
Certificates from other members of the design and construction team; and
(b) such plans, calculation, specifications and particulars as are deemed necessary
by the Assigned Certifier to show how the building as completed achieves
compliance with the Building Regulations and, indicating clearly, wherever
applicable, how these documents differ from any documents submitted to
accompany the commencement notice or submitted at a later date.

4.7 Change of Assigned Certifier and/or Builder
In the case of a change in the Assigned Certifier or the Builder during the project, the
Building Owner is required to do the following:
(a) where the Assigned Certifier or the Builder notified at commencement notice
stage withdraws from the project for whatever reason, the Building Owner should
submit a new Notice of Assignment along with the relevant form of Undertaking
signed by the new assignee;
(b) the new Assigned Certifier and/or new Builder should review the status of
compliance of the work completed and deal appropriately with the findings from
the review. This may involve consultation with the Building Control Authority.
In the event that the Assigned Certifier wishes to end their appointment or that it is
being terminated by the Building Owner during the course of the works, the Assigned
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 15
Certifier is required to provide to the Building Owner and to the Building Control
Authority the records of inspection up to the date on which their appointment ends,
along with any available certification of compliance of Design and/or Construction up
to that date. Measures should be taken during the course of the building or works to
ensure that matters relating to the payment of fees do not hinder this possible
eventuality.
A change of either the Assigned Certifier and/or the Builder will require liaison with
the Building Control Authority, who are expected to advise and assist the relevant
parties in relation to any action that may be required, having regard to the
circumstances involved, in order that the building or works notified at commencement
may be subject to a valid Certificate of Compliance on Completion.
This may involve a new Commencement Notice including a new Preliminary
Inspection Plan, so as to enable both the Assigned Certifier and the Builder to
appropriately describe the building or works for which they are responsible, and the
basis upon which a Completion Certificate will be issued.
The new Preliminary Inspection Plan will set out the necessary agreed additional
inspections, testing or reports, if any, to be carried out, so far as is reasonably
practicable, on the already built works.
The Assigned Certifier and the Builder are required to notify the Building Control
Authority before ceasing their role; other than where this is not physically possible, in
which case the Building Owner is required to undertake this duty.
A change of Assigned Certifier or Builder during the course of the works is a
significant alert to the risk analysis system of the Building Control Authority, which
may trigger an inspection of the Design and other documents and a site inspection.

5. Lodgement of Plans and Documentation
5.1 Plans and specifications
The Design Certifier and the Assigned Certifier, before signing the Design Certificate
and the form of Undertaking by the Assigned Certifier respectively, should exercise
reasonable skill, care and diligence in checking that the documentation for which
each is responsible is appropriate for lodgement with the Commencement Notice.
In some cases certain aspects of the building or works may not be fully designed at
commencement stage, but each such incomplete aspect or design element should be
identified in the submission which accompanies the Commencement Notice together
with an indicative date by which it is expected that the outstanding design element will
be completed. In all cases, an appropriate level of plans and documentation should
be submitted to the Building Control Authority.
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 16
The plans and documentation required at commencement stage where the works
involve a new dwelling, an extension (to a dwelling) with a total floor area greater
than 40 square metres or require a Fire Safety Certificate will include:
(a) general arrangement drawings – plans, sections and elevations –
prepared for building control purposes;
(b) a schedule of such plans, calculations, specifications and particulars as
are currently designed or as are to be prepared at a later date;
(c) the completion of an online assessment, via the Building Control
Management System, of the proposed approach to compliance with the
requirements of the Second Schedule to the Building Regulations (Parts A
to M);
(d) the Preliminary Inspection Plan prepared by the Assigned Certifier;
and may, typically, also include:
(e) drawings of particular details as appropriate;
(f) drawings showing work that is below ground;
(g) general arrangement structural drawings showing the main structural
elements
(h) specifications including materials and products; and performance
specification for elements that may be the subject of ancillary certification.

5.2 Other Documentation
Key documents as is appropriate should be submitted depending on the particular
building works.
Structural calculations and site investigation reports do not have to be submitted at
commencement stage. However, they should be kept and made available on request
to the Building Control Authority. The information should be provided to the Building
Control Authority within two weeks of being requested.

5.3 Lodgement of plans at later stage
Design work that is due for completion and specialist design that is not available for
submission at commencement stage should be certified and submitted at a later
stage. Drawings and documentation for these designs should be submitted before the
relevant work commences, with Ancillary Certificates of Compliance, where
appropriate. Similarly, drawings and documentation for changes or omissions should
be certified and submitted before the relevant work commences.
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 17

6. Commencement Stage

6.1 Online submission to Building Control Authority
The online submission at commencement stage will typically include the following: -
a) commencement notice (or 7 day notice);
b) plans, calculations, specifications and particulars as are necessary to
outline how the building proposed works or building will comply with the
requirements of the Second Schedule to the Building Regulations relevant
to the works or building concerned, and including -
· general arrangement drawings – including plans, sections and
elevations;
· a schedule of such plans, calculations, specifications and particulars
as are currently designed or are to be prepared at a later date;
· the completion of an online assessment, via the Building Control
Management System, of the proposed approach to compliance with
the requirements of the Second Schedule to the Building Regulations
(Parts A to M);
c) the preliminary Inspection Plan prepared by the Assigned Certifier;
d) a Design Certificate (with a schedule of Ancillary Certificates by members
of the design team, who should also sign their certificate);
e) a Notice of Assignment of Assigned Certifier by the Building Owner;
f) a Notice of Assignment of Builder by the Building Owner;
g) form of Undertaking by the Assigned Certifier;
h) form of Undertaking by the Builder and
i) the appropriate fee.

7. Construction Stage Inspection – by Certifiers

7.1 Inspection Plan
The Assigned Certifier and other persons nominated to undertake necessary
inspections should adopt an appropriate Inspection Plan which takes full account of
relevant factors for the building work concerned. Relevant factors should be
assessed at the outset and regularly reviewed so that effective control is maintained
for the duration of each project, with adequate site inspections and records sufficient
to demonstrate the application of reasonable skill, care and diligence.
The building control process, in order to be effective, requires an Inspection Plan of
appropriate intensity and frequency. However, it is not practicable for every item of
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 18
work to which the Building Regulations relate to be examined. The supervision by the
Builder is, therefore, of critical importance. The test of the Inspection Plan will be its
success in achieving reasonable standards of health and safety in or about buildings,
and of energy conservation, accessibility and sustainability for building users.
Inspection staff should use professional skill and judgement in their selection of
priorities for inspection. Depending on the complexity of the project, such inspections
may need to be carried out by personnel with greater expertise. Inspection staff
should be briefed by their employer and, where necessary, by the Assigned Certifier
on the Design lodged to the Building Control Authority and on appropriate inspections
and tests to carry out.

7.1.1 Factors in Determining Inspection Plan

The Inspection Plan is dependent on many factors including:
(a) type of building, type of construction and expertise of the Builder;
(b) how complicated or relatively straightforward the method of construction is;
(c) whether recent experience indicates current problems in interpreting and/or
achieving compliance with certain requirements;
(d) how serious the consequences of a particular contravention might be;
(e) the impracticability or impossibility of subsequent inspection of closed up
work; and
(f) the speed of construction, or methods of fast track construction.

7.1.2 Inspection

Subject to the appropriate professional judgement and risk assessment, and
recognising that it is not practicable to examine every item of work to which the
requirements of the Building Regulations relate, inspection arrangements should
normally make provision for inspection of:
(a) elements and components, the failure of which would, in the opinion of the
certifier, be significant;
(b) works which, in the opinion of the certifier, constitute unusual designs or
methods of construction;
(c) work relating to fire safety;
(d) types of work, construction, equipment or material which could, if not verified,
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 19
cause defects which would, in the opinion of the certifier or designated
inspector, be seriously detrimental to the fundamental purposes of the
Building Regulations; and
(e) additional areas of work necessary for the subsequent issue of a certificate at
completion.

7.2 Inspection frequency
The most important thing is to have an appropriate Inspection Plan; the scope and
frequency of inspection should be determined and incorporated in a formal written
plan. This plan should be kept under review as the project proceeds. It should take
into account the Inspection Plan factors above.
Periodic inspection should be carried out depending on the size and nature of the
particular building project. This should include critical milestone inspections and
inspections as set out in the Inspection Notification Framework (INF).

7.3 Inspection Notification Framework (INF)
The Assigned Certifier should, as part of the Inspection plan and before the
commencement of work on site, agree with the Building Owner and Builder an INF,
taking account of the building works involved and other factors. The INF should
identify generally the stages or items of work the individual certifiers wish to be
notified of, as and when they are ready for inspection.
The Assigned Certifier should make available an Inspection Plan including the
Inspection Notification Framework (INF), taking account of the complexity of the
project and other factors. The INF should identify generally the stages or items of
work which the Assigned Certifier wishes to be notified to him/her and nominated
Ancillary Certifiers when such stages or items are ready for inspection.
The INF should be prepared:
· in conjunction with the Inspection Plan;
· in consultation, as far as possible and necessary, with other members of the
Design and Construction team and with those providing Ancillary Certificates;
and,
· before the commencement of work on site;
and should be communicated to the Building Owner and Builder.
Each certifier and testing agency together with the Builder and others should then
respond, as appropriate, to all notifications identified in the INF.
NB: it should be made clear to the Builder that the Assigned Certifier and the other
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 20
persons referred to above may carry out unannounced inspections between the
stages identified in the INF and/or in the Inspection Plan.

7.4 Follow up procedures

Effective follow up procedures are essential to check that previously noted noncompliance
issues have been corrected. The person responsible for the particular
inspection, e.g. the Assigned Certifier or the Ancillary Certifiers, should check that the
matter raised has been resolved satisfactorily.

7.5 Tests

Certain tests may need to be carried out, as necessary, in order to demonstrate
compliance. In some cases such tests may be ones referred to in the Technical
Guidance Documents published to accompany the various parts (A to M) of the
Building Regulations. The Assigned Certifier and Ancillary Certifiers should consider
and identify the need for such tests at the earliest possible stage and as far in
advance as possible. They should include them, as far as possible, in the building
contract documentation where there is a contract in place.
The Inspection Plan and the INF should indicate the tests that the Certifiers wish to
monitor periodically and, where necessary, the Building Owner should be notified
about test requirements.

7.6 Records of inspection

Records of each inspection should be maintained by the person and firm responsible
and should be sufficient to identify the work inspected and any non-compliance.
Where the work inspected is not shown on drawings available to the person
inspecting, these records will necessarily be more detailed. It is important, in order to
ensure that proper, evidence-based inspection arrangements and procedures are in
place, that adequate records are maintained to show what works were inspected, the
results of the inspection and any remedial action considered necessary and when
such remedial action was carried out.

8. Completion Stage

8.1 Submission at completion
At completion stage, the Assigned Certifier is required to submit the following to the
Building Control Authority:
(a) a Certificate of Compliance on Completion signed by the Builder (at Part A) and
by the Assigned Certifier (at Part B);
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 21
(b) plans, calculations, specifications and particulars, showing how the completed
building has achieved compliance with the Building Regulations must be lodged
on the Building Control Management System when the Certificate of Compliance
on Completion is submitted or at an earlier date. Where design documents have
changed or supersede design documents previously lodged with the Building
Control Authority with the Commencement Notice or at a later date, any such
difference should be clearly identified;
(c) the Inspection Plan as implemented by the Assigned Certifier in accordance with
this Code of Practice.
NB: The Certificate of Compliance on Completion must be validated and registered
by the Building Control Authority before the building it relates to may be opened, used
or occupied. If rejected by Building Control Authority within 21 days, the certificate is
not valid.

8.2 Validation and Registration of Certificate
Where a Certificate of Compliance on Completion is received by a Building Control
Authority, the Authority should validate the certificate and place it on the register
where it is in order to do so within 21 days. The validation process will include
checking that the certificate was properly completed and signed by the appropriate
persons i.e. the Assigned Certifier and the Builder. The authority will check that there
are no unresolved matters in relation to requests for information, enforcement notices
or conditions attaching to Fire Safety Certificates, Disability Access Certificates, etc.
It is not appropriate for the Building Control Authority to commence a technical
assessment at this stage.
On receiving the certificate and accompanying documents, the Building Control
Authority will:
(a) record the date of receipt of the certificate (this should be done online);
(b) within the next 21 days consider whether the certificate is valid and:
1) if valid, include details of the certificate on the statutory register,
2) if the certificate is regarded as not being valid, the Building Control
Authority will reject the certificate and notify, giving reasons, the Assigned
Certifier that the certificate cannot be accepted or require the Assigned
Certifier to submit such revised certificate or additional documentation as
may be deemed necessary by the authority for the purposes of validation.
(c) where the Building Control Authority does not validate or reject a certificate or
seek a revised certificate or additional documentation within the 21 day
period, the certificate will be placed on the register automatically. A
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 22
development, where the Certificate of Compliance on Completion has been
registered will be deemed to comply with the certification procedures if it has
not been rejected by the Building Control Authority within the statutory 21 day
period;
(d) if the Building Control Authority requires a revised Certificate or further
documentation to be lodged, and such revised certificate or documentation is
submitted, the Building Control Authority may, within 7 days of the date of the
submission, seek additional clarification in relation to the revised certificate.
Where additional clarification is not sought by the Building Control Authority
within this seven day period, the Building Control Authority will include details
of the Certificate of Completion on the statutory register.

8.3 Nominated Date for Registration of Certificate

(a) Between 3 and 5 weeks prior to a nominated completion date for the building, the
Assigned Certifier may submit the required documentation demonstrating
compliance and the Inspection Plan to the Building Control Authority and ask the
Authority to proceed to consider the validity of the prospective Certificate of
Compliance on Completion with a view to facilitating the inclusion of the details of
the Certificate of Compliance on Completion on the statutory register on the
nominated date.
(b) The authority at that point arranges to undertake its validation checks and satisfy
itself that there are no unresolved matters in relation to requests under Section 11
of the Act or enforcement notices or conditions attached to Fire Safety
Certificates, Disability Access Certificates, etc. The authority will also check the
names of the Assigned Certifier and Builder as provided. Where the authority is
not satisfied that matters are in order it will notify the Assigned Certifier that a
Certificate of Compliance on Completion cannot be accepted and give reasons
why.
(c) Where the Building Control Authority is satisfied that all requirements in relation
to the submission of documentation have been met and where a valid Certificate
of Compliance on Completion (that is consistent with the project described in the
relevant commencement notice and the documentation submitted 3 to 5 weeks
earlier and signed by appropriate persons notified as having been assigned to act
as Builder and Assigned Certifier) is presented no later than one working day prior
to the nominated date, the Certificate of Compliance on Completion will be
included on the statutory register on the nominated date.
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 23

8.4 Phased Completion

For buildings that are completed for occupation on a phased basis for example
houses or apartment blocks, it is appropriate that Certificates of Compliance on
Completion for each phase may be submitted separately. In this regard, it should be
noted that a Certificate of Compliance on Completion may refer to works, buildings,
including areas within a building, or developments, including phases thereof. In such
circumstances, one or more certificate of compliance on completion may be
referenced to a single commencement notice. All Builders and Assigned Certifiers
signing Certificates of Compliance on Completion should clearly identify the precise
building units or works to which it relates. Where it is in order to do so, the Building
Control Authority should accept the certificate for the particular phase and place it on
the register.

9. Archiving of Records

Arrangements should be put in place by the Assigned Certifier and the Builder to
ensure that records relating to the full service they provided to individual projects are
retained for a minimum period of 6 years after completion. This should include
ancillary certificates, plans, calculations, specifications, documents and records of
inspection. A significant amount of these records may form part of the Safety File
provided for under the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work (Construction) Regulations
2013, in which case these records do not need to be retained separately.
Arrangements should be made by all relevant parties for their transfer into safe
keeping in the event of the holder of any relevant records ceasing to trade.

10. E-lodgements

The online Building Control Management System hosted by the Local Government
Management Agency has been developed for use by all building control authorities as
the preferred means of administration of building control functions. Owners, builders
and professionals who seek to make paper-based submissions after 1 March 2014
will be required to pay an administrative charge to cover the cost of scanning and
uploading their submissions. Statutory notice periods and validation timelines may
also be affected.

11. Professional Ethics

Once a client has engaged a certifier for a project or preliminary negotiations are in
progress, the professionalism with which that project is handled will be guided by the
codes of conduct of the appropriate registered professional bodies. These codes of
conduct are publicly available from the relevant professional bodies.
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 24

12. Insurance

There are various types of insurances that are provided in the construction industry.
Apart from general insurances such as employer’s liability and public liability
insurances there are other insurances including professional indemnity insurance,
and latent defects insurance policies provided by insurers who specialise in
construction related insurance. The provision of guidance in relation to insurance is
an important matter for consideration but it is outside the scope of this Code of
Practice. Owners, and homeowners in particular, who commission works should
generally satisfy themselves as to the adequacy of the insurances held by contractors
or professionals they may wish to consider engaging. Often the level and scope of
insurance cover held by other parties to a construction project will have a bearing on
the willingness or otherwise of other industry practitioners to become involved.

Building Control Regulations       Code of Practice
February, 2014 25
Appendix: List of Requirements under Building
Regulations
Ref.     Description    Apply    Does not apply  Partially applies   Comment
Part A - Structure
A1 Loading
A2 Ground movement
A3 Disproportionate
Collapse

Part B – Fire Safety
B1 Means of Escape
B2 Internal Fire Spread -
Structure
B3 Internal Fire Spread -
Linings
B4 External Fire Spread
B5 Access and Facilities
for the Fire Service

Part C – Site Preparation & Resistance to Moisture
C1 Preparation of Site
C2 Subsoil Drainage
C3 Dangerous Substances

Part D – Materials and Workmanship
D1 Materials and
Workmanship
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 26
Ref. Description Apply Does not
apply
Partially
applies
Comment

Part E - Sound
E1 Airborne Sound (walls)
E2 Airborne Sound (floors)
E3 Impact Sound (floors)

Part F - Ventilation
F1 Means of Ventilation
F2 Condensation in Roofs

Part G - Hygiene
G1 Bathrooms and
Kitchens
G2 Sanitary Conveniences
and Washing Facilities

Part H – Drainage and Waste Disposal
H1 Drainage System
H2 Septic Tanks

Part J – Heat Producing Appliances
J1 Air Supply
J2 Discharge of products
of Combustion
J3 Protection of Building
J4 Oil Storage Tank
Building Control Regulations Code of Practice
February, 2014 27
Ref. Description Apply Does not
apply
Partially
applies
Comment

Part K – Stairways, Ladders, Ramps and Guards
K1 Stairways, Ladders and
Ramps
K2 Protection from Falling
K3 Vehicle Ramps

Part L – Conservation of Fuel and Energy
L1 Conservation of Fuel
and Energy
L2 Conservation of Fuel
and Energy in Existing
Dwellings
L3 Conservation of Fuel
and Energy in New
Dwellings
L4 Conservation of Fuel
and Energy in Buildings
other than Dwellings

Part M – Access and Use
M1 Access and Use of
Buildings
M2 Sanitary Conveniences
M3 Audience or Spectator
Facilities

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Allianz Global Assistance (2)

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Ireland’s 1.6 million householders can now insure their homes against the cost of arranging emergency repairs, for burst water pipes, broken down boilers or even blocked drains.

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OCrafty

Untitled

 

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+353 (0)21 4700350 | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | www.crafty,ie

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Contact Information

Home
3 Greenmount Lane,
Harold's Cross,
Dublin 12
Phone
+353 1 473 2543
Lo-Call: 1890 20 70 50
Email
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Apply to National Guild

 

For information on applying to the National Guild of Master Craftsmen, contact Tanya McMenamin, Lo-Call 1890 20 70 50 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
with your contact details.